Silence

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Image courtesy of Agata Wierzbicka

This illustration takes the mirror image to a level of non symmetry that I find quite interesting. I mean obviously the image responds to itself with an added detail but it another thing that makes it diverge from symmetry in the traditional sense is the way the subjects are laid out. It’s clearly not a perfect mirror image but that means it’s also not a flat one; and this is also helped by the grey background and the unfinished feel that this illustration has.

This is a typical characteristic of Agata Wierzbicka’s work which you can check out here.

Zac Posen Fall 2015

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I guess today’s post is an unpopular opinion. Apparently the person who wrote the Vogue review of this show didn’t really like this dress. Also it’s a throwback to the first exhibition I ran on this blog rather than continuing on the one I launched this month, but it’s my blog and I think Naomi Campbell is totally rocking that dress even if she might be the only person in the world who can.

Anyway, this was the superficial fashion interlude and we’ll go back to art next week.

Terracotta Hydria | Mirror Image Exhibition

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Image courtesy of the Met Museum

I’ll be starting this year with a new exhibition called Mirror Image. It will deal both with the concept of symmetry and the idea of art in art, and  superimposing representations, as is shown in this vessel.

First things first, a hydria is a classical Greek pottery shape used for carrying water. This one is exhibited at the Met museum and dates back to around 500-510 BCE. It has a black-figure depiction of women filling their own hydriai at the fountain. This isn’t a rare thematic in Greek vessels. In fact, I know of two other hydriai with women at the fountain with hydriai depictions, one is at the Louvre and one at the Ashmolean. The practice becomes quite popular in the 6th century BCE

But this is what inspired me for this exhibition. I think it’s really cool the have pots depicted on pots, although it is not exceptional. Basically this vessel is saying “I’m a water vessel”. It’s like an early example of labeling. I think we’ll find through the exhibition that with time, depictions or references to the artist or object in art become more and more conscious and intentional.

Back to Greek pots though, if you’re interested in how black and red figure is achieved. This is one of the first thing you learn in art history/archaeology courses so there’s my time to brag about it. So the colors aren’t achieved through paint but by oxidation of the clay. The black parts were covered with a slip that turned black in one of the stages of firing. So essentially, while the vessel was being made, it was all the same color, then it was fired with low oxygen so that it turned entirely black. Then air was reintroduced slowly to turn the non-slipped parts back to orange. So basically the Greeks nailed firing. You can learn more here and there’s also many scholarly articles about it if you just browse academia.