Proenza Schouler Tumblr Collection

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Image courtesy of Vogue

Today’s fashion post was a struggle, so I’d like to thank my friend Hicham for the inspiration. I was looking for a self reflective fashion item/collection to include in the Mirror Image exhibition, and he suggested I check out this video. Not only do I now know how to pronounce Proenza Schouler, I also realized that they are really cool designers who are very accessible human beings. I felt that they were far from the high fashion superstar mega luxury industry thing while still being totally immersed in it, which is great.

Anyway if you watch the video you’ll see that their work is very much about their own experiences and how their inspiration comes from things in their lives. So the Tumblr collection is their Spring 2013 collection; and I think it’s self reflective to a level that surpasses just the designers themselves. Everyone has a Tumblr. Or at least everyone had a tumblr in 2012 before Pinterest took over, and I still have a Tumblr. This collection is about how random the internet can be but also how harmonious. And how it all makes sense once you put it together because in the end you’re the one curating what you want to see. Everyone is a curator these days, and the strength in this collection is that it’s the result of their personal curation. If I had my own Tumblr line, it would probably be way more pink with a ton of glitter and a more beachy landscapes. Also another thing that is strong about this collection and that they talk about in the video is the fact that they added materiality to it. Their work focuses a lot on textures, and that’s what gives an added dimension to their virtual inspiration.

I highly recommend you look at the rest of the collection here and that you follow Proenza Schouler’s tumblr.

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Bronze Head of a Woman

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Image courtesy of the British Museum

Today we’re looking at this female head made from bronze and filled with lead, which might have been a mirror cover. It was found in Greece and dates back to 350-330 BCE, and now belongs to the collection of the British Museum although it’s not on display.

Many ancient cultures used mirrors, and I came across mirror lids of varying styles and shapes while doing research for this post. Most of the classical ones have scenes engraved on them, so I kept this one because I found it to be more interesting, first of all in the way it’s carved. The lids that depict scenes are relatively flat with low relief engravings, whereas this one is carved in three dimensions. Also, the subject differs significantly and this one is much more related to the use of its corresponding object. Remember the water jar? This has essentially the same context  in that it’s an image of a person, featured on an object whose function is to give an image of the person. Of course, this may not be a mirror lid at all in which case this whole argument is pointless; but you can learn more about this artifact here and formulate your own opinion.