Seashore

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Image courtesy of Heels and Wheels

Roy Lichtenstein is my favorite pop artist. He didn’t only paint comic book style scenes. In fact, he also sculpted (I’ve seen two of his Brushtrokes sculptures in real life) and experimented with a variety of materials. Landscapes are a subject he tackled throughout his career. When you think about it, these landscapes are not that far from the comic book universe, as they would work as background and they are stylistically similar to Lichtenstein’s most famous artworks. His landscapes are also some of the pieces where he experimented a lot with materials. In a lot of the seascapes he made he used Rowlux, which is a holographic plastic-y material that he found quite fitting to represent the undulations of the sea. I chose Seashore because I like the visual rendering of the paint dotting better than the Rowlux, but you can check out the exhibition catalogue of the exhibition Roy Lichtenstein: Between Sea and Sky that took place last summer at Guid Hall here

Above we have an oil on plexiglas  painting from 1964 which belongs to the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. Lichtenstein uses his usual dotting technique to render the different layers of the sea, sky and rocks. This was painted on different layers of plexiglas for added depth. As always with Lichtenstein, it’s interesting that the small elements, bold lines and tiny dots form the complete picture. This painting only has 4 colors. No nuances in shading or anything. It’s simple but it has a dimension, which is something that I particularly appreciate with Lichtenstein in comparison to some other pop artists.

Anna’s Mess

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Image courtesy of Anna Polyviou

This dessert has 9 elements! It was created by Australian chef Anna Polyviou, who’s quite unconventional but super pro. As you can see in the video below, the dessert is meant to be smashed on a plate before being eaten. I still can’t decide if I find it cool or way too hipster but as you may know if you’re a regular reader, I like interactive art.

Also two good news:

  1. You can get Anna’s Mess at the Shangri-la in Sydney until July 11 (which makes it pretty much an exhibition)
  2. If you’re like me, an unfortunate human being who doesn’t live anywhere near Sydney, you can do it yourself. I mean yeah the recipe requires two ovens, 39 ingredients, and 73 steps no biggie. But hey at least it’s there for adventurous spirits.

At the Seams | Exhibition Review

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Image courtesy of Dar el Nimer

At the Seams is the first satellite exhibition of the Palestinian Museum, curated by the amazing Rachel Dedman. The exhibition is on at Dar el Nimer in Beirut until July 30 2016, and I highly recommend you don’t miss it, only just to see the building itself which is a magnificent building from the 1930s which has been extremely well refurbished.

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Image courtesy of the Palestinian Museum

I went to the opening, which was incredibly crowded, probably one of the most crowded openings I’ve been to in a non-major museum in Beirut. But that was justified by how great the exhibition is. At the Seams traces the political history of Palestine through embroidery. The exhibition is set up chronologically with dresses hanging alongside explanatory texts and videos. There are also tables with objects that help put the dresses back in context such as pictures of women wearing them. This kind of set up is consistent until the end of the exhibition, where it becomes more eclectic with posters and various objects exhibited. I haven’t had the chance to go back since the opening and explore it in depth but I really wanted to write this review while there is still some time to see the exhibition because it’s worth it.

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Loved this poster timeline

I’m not particularly interested in textile or embroidery, but the easy flowing design of the exhibition and the way embroidery is  taken from a politico-historical perspective make the exhibition a success. You learn a lot without getting bored, and it tackles a range of serious topics without feeling tragic. On the contrary, it puts Palestinian history under a colorful and intricate spotlight.

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Dar el Nimer is open Monday-Saturday from 11:00AM to 7:00PM (5:00PM during Ramadan)

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Image courtesy of Rachel Dedman