Spectral Bond – Light as Wave

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Image courtesy of McKenzie Fine Art

Today we’re looking at a drawing by Amy Myers, whose work reflect on her childhood in a family of physicians and on the female body. Yay for self-reflection again. This drawing from 2015 is gouache, pastel, and conte crayon on paper. Actually, Amy Myers uses many sheets of paper that she assembles together during her process. Her drawings are always symmetrical, but not always centered. I just picked a centered one because I’m a sucker for perfect symmetry. I like how whimsical and light her drawings are, while at the same time being very complex. Also as you may know by now, I like art that has a strong concept behind this; and this is definitely the case. You can really grasp the concept of atoms and networks, space, and the human body by just looking at the piece, which is what makes it successful in my opinion.

So keep an eye out for Amy Myers, cause I think she’s going places.

And here is a detail of the artwork since I couldn’t get a high res picture of the full one.

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Image courtesy of Hyperallergic

Self portrait in the studio at Peckham after Steenwyck the Younger

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Image courtesy of Art Daily

Today, we’re looking at a 2015 painting by the amazing Raqib Shaw. It’s part of a series of four paintings based on works from the National Gallery. I picked this one because it fits the exhibition particularly well, being a self portrait set inside the artist’s studio. A lot of imagery is reminiscent of himself and his work, such as the bronze sculpture which was first exhibited at the same time as this painting. Other elements that refer to the artist in this painting are his dogs and his champagne case.

I also like that there is an actual mirror at the center of the painting where the representation of the artist is reflected. This might be linked to the fact that it is adapted from an older painting by Steenwyck, dating back to 1610. As you can see if you compare it with the original below, Shaw kept the basic structure and format of the painting, as well as some striking elements: the architectural features, the tablecloth, and the floor design. His painting is more charged than the original, in his usual opulent style and with his particular technique of painting with enamel using a porcupine quill, which renders this precision and realistic feel. Another difference you will have noticed is the background, which features views on a garden in Shaw’s version. This is the view he has from his studio; so effectively, he hasn’t represented his workplace in terms of structural features but in terms of its exterior.

I’m a big fan of this painting because of its very personal nature but also because there is plenty to look at. It’s full of technique, color work, but also choices, which gives it a striking personality that I fell can sometimes get lost in a lot of contemporary art.

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The Serpentine Pavilion 2015

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If you’re in London and have nothing to do this weekend I highly suggest you go see the Serpentine pavilion, which is on until tomorrow. This year, it is designed by the architectural firm Selgascano and I think they did an amazing job. Really, my pictures don’t do it justice.

I was a little unsure as to how to categorize this post; but I ended up putting it in Walking Across because visiting the pavilion was an experience rather than a passive visit. It is relatively small but I spent quite a long time there, they have a small cafe set up inside so I sat and colored a whole mandala there. It was a nice feeling to be making art inside the art.

I think pictures are going to convey the feel of it better than words so I’m going to let you scroll through them (and spot me in the selfie!). Can’t wait to see next year’s pavilion now.

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