Fragment of glass cup

eMuseumPlus

Image courtesy of Benaki Museum

I know this isn’t the most visually appealing object ever (surprising right?) but I stumbled upon it at the Benaki Museum during my stay in Athens (expect some reviews soon!) and it intrigued because it’s stamped with a personification of the city of Tyre. I’m not hugely familiar with glass making and decoration techniques, since glass only starts to be used at the very end of the period I’m most interested in. This cup fragment is from the late 3rd-early 4th century A.D, so Roman times. I don’t have much information about it, just what the museum label says to me; and part of that is that it was found in Syria. Syria could mean largely Syria and Lebanon so it’s not excluded that this object might have been found in the actual city of Tyre, but don’t take my word for it.

I think it’s cool that cities have personifications, and this isn’t the first time I’ve encountered that of Tyre. It also helps archaeologists that this fragment is inscribed with the name of the city. In addition to the city of Tyre in the center, you can see the hand of a Nike holding a wreath, and the scales of justice. Side note, Nikes were victory goddesses in Ancient Greece so now you know a fun fact about the origin of the name of the brand.

So stay tuned for reviews of museums and activities in Athens and Crete, and I’m going to the Basque country next week as well so you can also expect a review of the Guggenheim Bilbao!

Seashore

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Image courtesy of Heels and Wheels

Roy Lichtenstein is my favorite pop artist. He didn’t only paint comic book style scenes. In fact, he also sculpted (I’ve seen two of his Brushtrokes sculptures in real life) and experimented with a variety of materials. Landscapes are a subject he tackled throughout his career. When you think about it, these landscapes are not that far from the comic book universe, as they would work as background and they are stylistically similar to Lichtenstein’s most famous artworks. His landscapes are also some of the pieces where he experimented a lot with materials. In a lot of the seascapes he made he used Rowlux, which is a holographic plastic-y material that he found quite fitting to represent the undulations of the sea. I chose Seashore because I like the visual rendering of the paint dotting better than the Rowlux, but you can check out the exhibition catalogue of the exhibition Roy Lichtenstein: Between Sea and Sky that took place last summer at Guid Hall here

Above we have an oil on plexiglas  painting from 1964 which belongs to the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. Lichtenstein uses his usual dotting technique to render the different layers of the sea, sky and rocks. This was painted on different layers of plexiglas for added depth. As always with Lichtenstein, it’s interesting that the small elements, bold lines and tiny dots form the complete picture. This painting only has 4 colors. No nuances in shading or anything. It’s simple but it has a dimension, which is something that I particularly appreciate with Lichtenstein in comparison to some other pop artists.

Anna’s Mess

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Image courtesy of Anna Polyviou

This dessert has 9 elements! It was created by Australian chef Anna Polyviou, who’s quite unconventional but super pro. As you can see in the video below, the dessert is meant to be smashed on a plate before being eaten. I still can’t decide if I find it cool or way too hipster but as you may know if you’re a regular reader, I like interactive art.

Also two good news:

  1. You can get Anna’s Mess at the Shangri-la in Sydney until July 11 (which makes it pretty much an exhibition)
  2. If you’re like me, an unfortunate human being who doesn’t live anywhere near Sydney, you can do it yourself. I mean yeah the recipe requires two ovens, 39 ingredients, and 73 steps no biggie. But hey at least it’s there for adventurous spirits.

Bits and Pieces

Today we’re starting a new exhibition, Bits and Pieces which will be looking at details, miniature items, and small components  of bigger pieces.

This installation by German artist Nils Volker inspired the name and theme of the exhibition.It consists of 108 expandable toys suspended in space. The balls are moved by small motors (each one has its own) for smooth movement. This installation was on display for a month at Gallery Nome in Berlin, and you can learn more about it here.

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Images and video courtesy of the artist