Mandala 11

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The Place Where Wishes Come True

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Image courtesy of Sena Runa

Sena Runa is a Turkish artist who quit her day job less than a year ago to dedicate herself to paper quilling. She creates small paper sculpture (this one is 30x40cm) from colored paper. Paper quilting consists of rolling and gluing pieces of paper together to create patterns.

It might not be monumental or a museum piece but I think it’s a nice example of where contemporary art  is going, with people working from their houses and getting noticed through the internet. Thank you tumblr and pinterest.

It also shows you how thin the limit between crafting and art is. I am going to keep following updates of this artist because I think she has great potential, even if she never ends up being exhibited in a significant way.

So check out her work here, she also has an etsy store if you’d like to own a piece.

Silence/Shapes

All images courtesy of Filippo Minelli

Today I’m posting some contemporary art. This series by Filippo Minelli is a work on shaping silence and bringing attention to a happening in a certain set. The artist creates his photographs by setting up smoke bombs in selected locations. The essence of it is to capture the moment in a photograph; not to create a performance or installation.

The use of colored smoke bombs for silence is well thought through as they are usually associated with protests, crowds, and loud noises. This is entirely reinterpreted here and we see them put out of context, which is what art does I guess. There’s a lot more of conceptual thought behind the project, and you can read about that and see more pictures here but I like the fact that they have a high aesthetic value (in my opinion at least) in addition to a solid concept. I think that a lot of contemporary art is so conceptual and abstract (in the semantic not the artistic sense) that it eats up on the looks of it.

So if you’re a fan of Minelli make sure to check out his website here. He has other works about silence, and a favorite of mine is the Geometry of Silence installations which I might post about as well.

The Serpentine Pavilion 2015

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If you’re in London and have nothing to do this weekend I highly suggest you go see the Serpentine pavilion, which is on until tomorrow. This year, it is designed by the architectural firm Selgascano and I think they did an amazing job. Really, my pictures don’t do it justice.

I was a little unsure as to how to categorize this post; but I ended up putting it in Walking Across because visiting the pavilion was an experience rather than a passive visit. It is relatively small but I spent quite a long time there, they have a small cafe set up inside so I sat and colored a whole mandala there. It was a nice feeling to be making art inside the art.

I think pictures are going to convey the feel of it better than words so I’m going to let you scroll through them (and spot me in the selfie!). Can’t wait to see next year’s pavilion now.

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Mandala 6

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Here’s a mandala drawn by Nina Cobri that I colored in 2013.

I also want to say that I’ll be going to London for 10 days tomorrow, so the blog won’t be updated during this time. However, you can follow me on Instagram @museumandmusings and on Snapchat @lamia.sassine for live updates. Stay on the lookout for new posts, reviews and exhibitions coming soon and thank you for reading/following.

Blue Green Yellow Orange Red

Image courtesy of the Guggenheim

This painting by Ellsworth Kelly from 1966 consists of 4 panels of oil on canvas, and belongs to the collection of the Guggenheim museum (review coming soon), although I don’t think it’s currently on display because I don’t remember seeing it when I was there.

Note that Kelly had a reasoning behind his painting of solid colors, which is a composition he started experimenting with in the 1950s. For him, they represent the extracted essence of the objects he was painting. Instead of making a figurative representation, he broke things down to the most basic shapes and colors. These paintings also have a sculptural dimension to them because they have no figurative elements and therefore the focus is on their relationship to each other and to the space they are in.

The MFA has a similar composition (pictured below) from 1968 which actually inspired me to post about this one. In fact, you can see that the sculptural dimension is much more obvious in the second painting because the colors are not only arranged by their order in the spectrum but also by panel size.

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