Spectral Bond – Light as Wave

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Image courtesy of McKenzie Fine Art

Today we’re looking at a drawing by Amy Myers, whose work reflect on her childhood in a family of physicians and on the female body. Yay for self-reflection again. This drawing from 2015 is gouache, pastel, and conte crayon on paper. Actually, Amy Myers uses many sheets of paper that she assembles together during her process. Her drawings are always symmetrical, but not always centered. I just picked a centered one because I’m a sucker for perfect symmetry. I like how whimsical and light her drawings are, while at the same time being very complex. Also as you may know by now, I like art that has a strong concept behind this; and this is definitely the case. You can really grasp the concept of atoms and networks, space, and the human body by just looking at the piece, which is what makes it successful in my opinion.

So keep an eye out for Amy Myers, cause I think she’s going places.

And here is a detail of the artwork since I couldn’t get a high res picture of the full one.

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Image courtesy of Hyperallergic

Edward Scissorhands

Image courtesy of Brent Noll

To continue Halloween month in style, I chose to display this drawing of Edward Scissorhands drawn by Tim Burton himself. I did dress up as this character for Halloween once and it is one of my favorite movies, so I didn’t really hesitate to pick a Tim Burton drawing. Speaking of which, you can look at some of them on his website over here.

Hydrangeas and Swallow

Image courtesy of the MFA

I saw this woodblock print by Hokusai (from an ink and color on paper illustration) at the MFA during the Hokusai exhibition. This piece from 1833 struck me as my favorite among all the artworks that were displayed, so I decided to share it here. It’s still part of the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, as was all the content of this exhibitions, but it is not currently on display.

Icarus Complex

Image courtesy of Gonzalo Fuenmayor

Image courtesy of Gonzalo Fuenmayor

This charcoal on paper drawing by Gonzalo Fuenmayor was realized in 2011, as part of a project entitled “Tropicalia” which explores mixed identities in colonial Latin America. He uses strong symbolic imagery to represent clich√©s of exoticism with the banana plants and Victorian luxury and opulence with the chandelier for example. The point is to find equilibrium and harmony within this contrast of cultures.

This art actually sets the stage for a photography project which I will post about tomorrow done in 2014, where Fuenmayor takes these concepts even further, so make sure you come back to check out the Papare project. In the meantime, you can look at more of his works on his website or head to the MFA to see his first solo exhibition which is on until September 13.