At the Seams | Exhibition Review

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Image courtesy of Dar el Nimer

At the Seams is the first satellite exhibition of the Palestinian Museum, curated by the amazing Rachel Dedman. The exhibition is on at Dar el Nimer in Beirut until July 30 2016, and I highly recommend you don’t miss it, only just to see the building itself which is a magnificent building from the 1930s which has been extremely well refurbished.

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Image courtesy of the Palestinian Museum

I went to the opening, which was incredibly crowded, probably one of the most crowded openings I’ve been to in a non-major museum in Beirut. But that was justified by how great the exhibition is. At the Seams traces the political history of Palestine through embroidery. The exhibition is set up chronologically with dresses hanging alongside explanatory texts and videos. There are also tables with objects that help put the dresses back in context such as pictures of women wearing them. This kind of set up is consistent until the end of the exhibition, where it becomes more eclectic with posters and various objects exhibited. I haven’t had the chance to go back since the opening and explore it in depth but I really wanted to write this review while there is still some time to see the exhibition because it’s worth it.

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Loved this poster timeline

I’m not particularly interested in textile or embroidery, but the easy flowing design of the exhibition and the way embroidery is  taken from a politico-historical perspective make the exhibition a success. You learn a lot without getting bored, and it tackles a range of serious topics without feeling tragic. On the contrary, it puts Palestinian history under a colorful and intricate spotlight.

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Dar el Nimer is open Monday-Saturday from 11:00AM to 7:00PM (5:00PM during Ramadan)

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Image courtesy of Rachel Dedman

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Bolshoi Academy x Erickson Beamon x Milk Studio

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Image from Tumblr

This picture was taken during the 2011 New York Fashion week; during which ballerinas from the Bolshoi Academy showcased jewelry by Erickson Beamon at Milk Studio.  When I first stumbled upon it, I thought it was a nice editorial shot and got excited about it but then I looked it up and found out it was actually a picture from an event (which is why there are no photo credits). So basically an event happened at Milk Studio where those ballerinas were having a life installation wearing pieces from Erickson Beamon’s collection.

It’s very posh but also kind of cool; and I like this photo in particular because of the aesthetics and because it’s a photograph reflection on two other arts, dance and fashion. Another cool thing about it is that it’s a very contemporary approach both in the presentation and in the nature of the arts. It’s not your classic painting/drawing/sculpture but it has a sense of timeless beauty while belonging exactly to the present (well 2011 at least).

Proenza Schouler Tumblr Collection

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Image courtesy of Vogue

Today’s fashion post was a struggle, so I’d like to thank my friend Hicham for the inspiration. I was looking for a self reflective fashion item/collection to include in the Mirror Image exhibition, and he suggested I check out this video. Not only do I now know how to pronounce Proenza Schouler, I also realized that they are really cool designers who are very accessible human beings. I felt that they were far from the high fashion superstar mega luxury industry thing while still being totally immersed in it, which is great.

Anyway if you watch the video you’ll see that their work is very much about their own experiences and how their inspiration comes from things in their lives. So the Tumblr collection is their Spring 2013 collection; and I think it’s self reflective to a level that surpasses just the designers themselves. Everyone has a Tumblr. Or at least everyone had a tumblr in 2012 before Pinterest took over, and I still have a Tumblr. This collection is about how random the internet can be but also how harmonious. And how it all makes sense once you put it together because in the end you’re the one curating what you want to see. Everyone is a curator these days, and the strength in this collection is that it’s the result of their personal curation. If I had my own Tumblr line, it would probably be way more pink with a ton of glitter and a more beachy landscapes. Also another thing that is strong about this collection and that they talk about in the video is the fact that they added materiality to it. Their work focuses a lot on textures, and that’s what gives an added dimension to their virtual inspiration.

I highly recommend you look at the rest of the collection here and that you follow Proenza Schouler’s tumblr.

Zac Posen Fall 2015

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I guess today’s post is an unpopular opinion. Apparently the person who wrote the Vogue review of this show didn’t really like this dress. Also it’s a throwback to the first exhibition I ran on this blog rather than continuing on the one I launched this month, but it’s my blog and I think Naomi Campbell is totally rocking that dress even if she might be the only person in the world who can.

Anyway, this was the superficial fashion interlude and we’ll go back to art next week.

Viktor & Rolf Spring 2010

Image courtesy of style.com

There was a time in my life when I was obsessed with Fashion tv and I used to spend hours watching runway shows. A couple of them stayed in my head, and in particular this Viktor and Rolf collection featuring cut tulle dresses. I think the rigidity and the lightness of the tulle make a very interesting paradox in this collection, which mixes very feminine shapes and textures with some more rigid and masculine elements. This collection is all about contrast and visually it works really harmoniously.

Alluring Siren | Spooky to Surreal Exhibtion

Image courtesy of Lookbook.nu

Apologies for the less frequent posting but as you may know I’m working now and it’s been quite busy this week.

The good news is it’s October which means Halloween month, and I decided to have a special exhibition to celebrate my favorite holiday. Spooky to Surreal will be about all things strange and out of place, and the first entry in this exhibit is an actual Halloween costume. This look was created by Maane Ulv as a contest entry for the Lookbook x Blackmilk Halloween contest in 2013.

Three links are worth checking out if you’re interested:

Littledrill for J.Crew

Image courtesy of Littledrill

I discovered Shelby Edwards, aka Little Drill on Instagram. She doesn’t have a massive online presence so I can’t tell you much more about her. She photographs objects in bright color schemes and experiments with their aesthetics to reinterpret them. You can check out her website here but I suggest you follow her on Instagram over here.

Chanel Spring 2009 Couture

Image courtesy of style.com

A lot of the pieces in this entirely black and white collection look extremely pure and simple. Most of the shapes are very linear and basic, but the devil is in the details. Mirroring the intricate laser-cut headgear the models were wearing; the outfits all have intricately woven details and textures that are anything but bland.

This collection is a take on the intricate tangles between simplicity and complexity, and I think this is what makes it successful and interesting. It shows that it’s not all about color and shape and everything the eye catches at first glance but also about texture. Actually, this particular outfit reminds me of White on White by Malevich (which I should make a post about, it fits this exhibition pretty well).

Image courtesy of style.com

Christopher Kane Resort 2011

Image courtesy of style.com

I selected this look from the Christopher Kane Resort 2011 collection because the galaxy/nebula print really became iconic after this. This particular outfit is my favorite, I love the effect of the jacket, but you can make up your own mind by checking out the rest of the collection right here.