Blue Green Yellow Orange Red

Image courtesy of the Guggenheim

This painting by Ellsworth Kelly from 1966 consists of 4 panels of oil on canvas, and belongs to the collection of the Guggenheim museum (review coming soon), although I don’t think it’s currently on display because I don’t remember seeing it when I was there.

Note that Kelly had a reasoning behind his painting of solid colors, which is a composition he started experimenting with in the 1950s. For him, they represent the extracted essence of the objects he was painting. Instead of making a figurative representation, he broke things down to the most basic shapes and colors. These paintings also have a sculptural dimension to them because they have no figurative elements and therefore the focus is on their relationship to each other and to the space they are in.

The MFA has a similar composition (pictured below) from 1968 which actually inspired me to post about this one. In fact, you can see that the sculptural dimension is much more obvious in the second painting because the colors are not only arranged by their order in the spectrum but also by panel size.

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No No Ikebana

Image courtesy of the Guggenheim Museum

This series of 3 chromogenic prints by Sharon Lockhart, 2003, show Ikebana arranged by Haruko Takeichi. Ikebana is the Japanese art of aesthetically arranging florals. Takeichi is part of a rural community that creates Ikebana with vegetables and crops as a response to the elitist aspect of the art. These photographs were taken over the course of a month as Lockhart is interested in showing the effects of time on the composition. At the Guggenheim, they are displayed side by side in three separate frames; which I think serves this purpose better than stacking them on top of each other. Stay tuned for a review of the Guggenheim and head over to Sharon Lockhart’s website if you’d like to check out more of her art.

Quantum Field-X3

Above images courtesy of mymodernmet.com

Image Courtesy of Flick

This giant installation was set up outside the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao between August 2003 and April 2004. It is the work of Japanese artist Hiro Yamagata and consists of two gigantic rectangular structures composed of holographic panels onto which laser beams were projected.

The aim of this project was to push the limits of human perception and to try and show the naked eye what it cannot see, such as the light particles of the laser beams as they were projected on the panels. I think the scale of this project is what makes it really successful and I wish I could have seen it while it was on. I probably would have watched the changing colors for hours actually; so hopefully something similar will be coming up in the near future.