Bits and Pieces

Today we’re starting a new exhibition, Bits and Pieces which will be looking at details, miniature items, and small components  of bigger pieces.

This installation by German artist Nils Volker inspired the name and theme of the exhibition.It consists of 108 expandable toys suspended in space. The balls are moved by small motors (each one has its own) for smooth movement. This installation was on display for a month at Gallery Nome in Berlin, and you can learn more about it here.

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Images and video courtesy of the artist

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All Art Has Been Contemporary

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Image courtesy of the MFA Boston

This neon installation by Maurizio Nannucci is part of the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. You can check out the picture below to see how it looks like on display today. Nannucci is an artist who works a lot with neon, but this piece is particularly striking to me because it’s self referring. It’s a reflection on art by an artist, and more specifically on contemporary art by a contemporary artist. Now for the backstory, I’ve been getting more and more interested in contemporary art thanks to my current job, and I find it interesting how simple it can be while at the same time conveying some important depth. All art has indeed been contemporary, but not all art has been called contemporary. Should we have a new designation for what is understood today as contemporary art or is that the job of future generations to classify it and figure it out? A lot of artistic currents in the past were self named and it’s not all a categorization imposed by art historians. So yeah, after all, a piece of art is something that should trigger some sort of thinking; and this is working quite well here.DSC_1234

The Serpentine Pavilion 2015

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If you’re in London and have nothing to do this weekend I highly suggest you go see the Serpentine pavilion, which is on until tomorrow. This year, it is designed by the architectural firm Selgascano and I think they did an amazing job. Really, my pictures don’t do it justice.

I was a little unsure as to how to categorize this post; but I ended up putting it in Walking Across because visiting the pavilion was an experience rather than a passive visit. It is relatively small but I spent quite a long time there, they have a small cafe set up inside so I sat and colored a whole mandala there. It was a nice feeling to be making art inside the art.

I think pictures are going to convey the feel of it better than words so I’m going to let you scroll through them (and spot me in the selfie!). Can’t wait to see next year’s pavilion now.

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Elusive Electricity

Image courtesy of re-title

I discovered Lebanese artist Ayah Bdeir while compiling a database of Lebanese artists at work. She mixes art an technology in a really cool way and you can check out her work here.

This neon cable installation created in 2011 in collaboration with Hitumi Nanayakkara and Bassam Jalgha spells out “Ejet Ejet”, which translates to “It Came, It Came” in Arabic. This sentence refers to the shortage of electricity in Lebanon. People are often asking if the electricity “came”. What is even cooler about this installation is that it dims as you get closer to it, and eventually turns off. I find it admirable that Ayah Bdeir managed to capture such an important concept of the Lebanese society in such a simple installation. Less is more I guess.

Lime Green Icicle Tower

DSC_1219This incredible sculpture is a blown glass and steel installation made in 2011 by American artist Dale Chihuly. It is currently exhibited in the Shapiro courtyard at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (check out my review here). This piece is over 12m tall, you can compare it to the size of the people in the picture, and it looks like a huge pile of leaves. I think it looks great where it is exhibited, it’s so eye-catching but without being imposing. Stay tuned for more work by Chihuly because I’m a great fan of his art and I find it incredibly impressive.

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Above images courtesy of mymodernmet.com

Image Courtesy of Flick

This giant installation was set up outside the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao between August 2003 and April 2004. It is the work of Japanese artist Hiro Yamagata and consists of two gigantic rectangular structures composed of holographic panels onto which laser beams were projected.

The aim of this project was to push the limits of human perception and to try and show the naked eye what it cannot see, such as the light particles of the laser beams as they were projected on the panels. I think the scale of this project is what makes it really successful and I wish I could have seen it while it was on. I probably would have watched the changing colors for hours actually; so hopefully something similar will be coming up in the near future.