Seashore

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Image courtesy of Heels and Wheels

Roy Lichtenstein is my favorite pop artist. He didn’t only paint comic book style scenes. In fact, he also sculpted (I’ve seen two of his Brushtrokes sculptures in real life) and experimented with a variety of materials. Landscapes are a subject he tackled throughout his career. When you think about it, these landscapes are not that far from the comic book universe, as they would work as background and they are stylistically similar to Lichtenstein’s most famous artworks. His landscapes are also some of the pieces where he experimented a lot with materials. In a lot of the seascapes he made he used Rowlux, which is a holographic plastic-y material that he found quite fitting to represent the undulations of the sea. I chose Seashore because I like the visual rendering of the paint dotting better than the Rowlux, but you can check out the exhibition catalogue of the exhibition Roy Lichtenstein: Between Sea and Sky that took place last summer at Guid Hall here

Above we have an oil on plexiglas  painting from 1964 which belongs to the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. Lichtenstein uses his usual dotting technique to render the different layers of the sea, sky and rocks. This was painted on different layers of plexiglas for added depth. As always with Lichtenstein, it’s interesting that the small elements, bold lines and tiny dots form the complete picture. This painting only has 4 colors. No nuances in shading or anything. It’s simple but it has a dimension, which is something that I particularly appreciate with Lichtenstein in comparison to some other pop artists.

Silence/Shapes

All images courtesy of Filippo Minelli

Today I’m posting some contemporary art. This series by Filippo Minelli is a work on shaping silence and bringing attention to a happening in a certain set. The artist creates his photographs by setting up smoke bombs in selected locations. The essence of it is to capture the moment in a photograph; not to create a performance or installation.

The use of colored smoke bombs for silence is well thought through as they are usually associated with protests, crowds, and loud noises. This is entirely reinterpreted here and we see them put out of context, which is what art does I guess. There’s a lot more of conceptual thought behind the project, and you can read about that and see more pictures here but I like the fact that they have a high aesthetic value (in my opinion at least) in addition to a solid concept. I think that a lot of contemporary art is so conceptual and abstract (in the semantic not the artistic sense) that it eats up on the looks of it.

So if you’re a fan of Minelli make sure to check out his website here. He has other works about silence, and a favorite of mine is the Geometry of Silence installations which I might post about as well.

Untitled Series by AmourAmelia

All images courtesy of AmourAmelia

This set was created in November 2014 by a young photographer who goes by the name of AmourAmelia.I particularly like the fact that these photos are portraits and landscapes at the same time. It gives them quite a strong identity. Otherwise, I think she has really good editing skills and is worth checking out (click here for her website).