Bronze Head of a Woman

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Image courtesy of the British Museum

Today we’re looking at this female head made from bronze and filled with lead, which might have been a mirror cover. It was found in Greece and dates back to 350-330 BCE, and now belongs to the collection of the British Museum although it’s not on display.

Many ancient cultures used mirrors, and I came across mirror lids of varying styles and shapes while doing research for this post. Most of the classical ones have scenes engraved on them, so I kept this one because I found it to be more interesting, first of all in the way it’s carved. The lids that depict scenes are relatively flat with low relief engravings, whereas this one is carved in three dimensions. Also, the subject differs significantly and this one is much more related to the use of its corresponding object. Remember the water jar? This has essentially the same context  in that it’s an image of a person, featured on an object whose function is to give an image of the person. Of course, this may not be a mirror lid at all in which case this whole argument is pointless; but you can learn more about this artifact here and formulate your own opinion.

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Camera Selfies

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Image courtesy of Seen by

Camera Selfies is a series by J.F. Novotny, a German photographer who experiments with the concept of the selfie and applies it to vintage cameras. He places the camera in front of a wallpaper (which is sometimes too elaborate for my taste in some of the photos) contemporary to the camera. His aim is to capture the personality of each camera in a false self portrait. The viewer sees the artwork from the perspective of the mirror.

I find the idea more interesting than the artworks themselves but still worth publishing. I particularly like the Polaroid selfies since you can see a triple reflection of the subject; as the camera itself, the developed photo, and the reflection in the lens.

You can check out the rest of the series or even buy them here.

Reflections

All photos courtesy of Sebastian Magnani

This photo set is a current project by Swiss photographer Sebastian Magnani. The pictures were shot in various locations and explore the effects rendered by a spherical mirror lain on the ground. I find the relationship between the ground and the sky, as reflected in the mirror, to be super intriguing. It’s not often that we get to look at the floor and at the sky at the same time and it’s interesting to see how they may or may not be related. The mirror is the connecting point between them here and sometimes, what’s reflected in it can explain what we see on the ground. In other cases though, it’s like they’re two different worlds. What I also like about these pictures is that the floor serves as a sort of frame for what’s reflected in the mirror and I think it’s a fitting one because it’s what naturally falls under this reflection.

Ok enough deep talking, you can check out the rest of the pictures here.