Third Thursdays at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

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Today’s post is a throwback to my trip to Boston last year. Apologies for the lack of pictures, my phone was in a pitiful state at the time.

Many museums have monthly events like a mini party, and I went to one at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. I hadn’t had the chance to visit the museum before, and this was not the best time to do so as it was pretty crowded; but I still got a relatively good feel of it. So Third Thursdays happen every third thursday of each month there, and they’re an evening event featuring some live music, spotlight talks, and alcohol. There was a mini treasure hunt the day I went which was really cool and fit the spirit of the museum.

This post is not going to be a fully fleshed museum review because it wasn’t  fully fleshed visit, but I will share my observations. The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is a house museum, which is usually not my thing, but this one is really beautiful. Plus, Isabella Stewart Gardner was an art patron and collector herself, which makes it so much more interesting because you get to see her collection as well as her house. I think this museum gets a little overshadowed by the MFA which is very nearby, but it tells a completely different story and is much more intimate without being small. I highly encourage everyone to visit it, on a Third Thursday or not, and I will definitely go back there on my next trip to Boston.

Here is some info on the upcoming Third Thursdays

And some info on Isabella Stewart Gardner who’s a very cool woman to look up to since it was International Women’s Day last week

And finally a link to the museum’s websiteIMG-20150619-WA0010

Walking Across the D.C Monuments

I picked a really bad time for my monuments walk across D.C. It was late afternoon in June but it was still unbearably hot and my phone was running out of battery (which explains the lack of original pictures in this post). I was on the verge of giving up and go home but it was my last day there so I sucked it up and did it anyway. Here’s a link to a good map so you can follow the itinerary as you read.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia

I started at the Jefferson Memorial, which is this nice neat classical building you see pictured above. There’s a statue of Thomas Jefferson and some engraving of his quotes inside.

Image courtesy of wikimedia

I then walked to the Franklin Roosevelt Memorial (aka FDR Memorial). This one was probably on of my favorites. It is set on a horizontal stripe of land and mainly consists of fountains, as you can see on the above picture. It also has a statue of Roosevelt (and his dog), and some quotes engraved. I learned when I was there that the fountains are not an architectural coincidence as water was an important element for Roosevelt himself.

Image courtesy of Atlanta Black Star

My next stop was the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial (pictured above). As you probably have guessed already, it’s a giant stone statue of him with some quotes. Eh. Aesthetically, I didn’t find it that pleasing.

Image courtesy of wikimedia

Then, I walked through the Korean war veterans memorial, which is a field of statues of soldiers, to get to the Lincoln Memorial (pictured above). Again, it’s a classical looking building with a huge statue of Lincoln and quotes on the inside. The most enjoyable part of this monument though is the view you get from it. There is a large reflecting pool leading to the Washington monument right in front of it. I paused there for a while before finishing my walk.

Image courtesy of wikimedia

At the opposite end of the reflecting pool (and after passing through the Vietnam war memorial, another field of soldiers), is the World War II Memorial, a large oval fountain with names of all the states. I also appreciated this monument a lot.

Image courtesy of wikimedia

And last but not least is the Washington Monument, a tall white obelisk that you can see from pretty much anywhere in the National Mall. The whole walk took about 2 hours, with breaks at some of the monuments. I skipped the Capitol because it’s a bit off path and I got a closer look at it another day, and the White House because you can’t really get close anyway. In the end, I didn’t regret doing the walk. It’s quite a touristy thing to do but it’s a unique experience and all the monuments are quite impressive. It would have been a shame to miss it. I recommend doing it under temperate weather conditions though because it is a lot of walking outdoors. You can also visit the monuments at night when they are lit up.

Walking Across Beacon Hill

Snapchat--622479766898907588Note: I’m not great with pictures, especially since these are taken from my snapchat story but I’m getting better.

I decided to visit Beacon Hill on a rainy day in Boston. It’s a good option if you want to walk around the city but do things that are less touristy than the Freedom Trail. It was a short walk, about an hour, but you can stop by to visit some sites on the way. Beacon Hill is a 19th century historic district with a lot of charm. It is quite a high end residential neighborhood located in the center of Boston.

I started at the Massachusetts State House (picture below), which you can get to by taking the T to Park Street. You can visit the State House for free. I then walked along Beacon Street, which overlooks Boston Common; and turned up onto Joy Street to reach Mount Vernon Street. Mount Vernon Street is a picturesque alley with many notable buildings, such at the Nichols House Museum (at number 55), which I wanted to visit but I got there after opening hours.

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About halfway down Mount Vernon Street, I turned onto Louisburg Square, which notably housed Senator John Kerry and Louisa May Alcott. I then walked across Lewis Street to reach Acorn Street (pictured below), a tiny pedestrian cobblestone alley that is believed to be the most photographed street in America. It is filled with tiny houses that were originally inhabited by servants of the families who lived in the large houses on the main streets.

I walked on Acorn Street then reached West Cedar Street, then walked down to Chestnut street until I reached Charles street. This is the most commercial street of Beacon Hill and is filled with cute boutiques, antiques shops, and local bakeries and restaurants. I strolled along there for a while and this is where I finished my walk.

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To learn more about Beacon Hill and check out the itinerary I followed, head here. All in all, it’s a charming neighborhood, probably my favorite in Boston and I really enjoyed my walk there.

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American Musings

Dear readers,

I am currently on a three week trip to the East Coast of the USA and I’ll be spending time in Boston, New York, and Washington DC. This means that a lot of new posts are coming up but as I’m trying to make the most of my trip, I won’t have time to update the blog a lot until I’m back home. This is just my second day and I already have a review of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston starting to be drafted plus some new ideas for exhibitions and some artwork to share. I just don’t want to post stuff before syncing my pictures and I would like to take the time to write good posts and not just rushed stuff because I feel like this would be unfair.

So stay on the lookout for lots of new updates very soon and thank you for your patience 🙂