All Art Has Been Contemporary

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Image courtesy of the MFA Boston

This neon installation by Maurizio Nannucci is part of the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. You can check out the picture below to see how it looks like on display today. Nannucci is an artist who works a lot with neon, but this piece is particularly striking to me because it’s self referring. It’s a reflection on art by an artist, and more specifically on contemporary art by a contemporary artist. Now for the backstory, I’ve been getting more and more interested in contemporary art thanks to my current job, and I find it interesting how simple it can be while at the same time conveying some important depth. All art has indeed been contemporary, but not all art has been called contemporary. Should we have a new designation for what is understood today as contemporary art or is that the job of future generations to classify it and figure it out? A lot of artistic currents in the past were self named and it’s not all a categorization imposed by art historians. So yeah, after all, a piece of art is something that should trigger some sort of thinking; and this is working quite well here.DSC_1234

Elusive Electricity

Image courtesy of re-title

I discovered Lebanese artist Ayah Bdeir while compiling a database of Lebanese artists at work. She mixes art an technology in a really cool way and you can check out her work here.

This neon cable installation created in 2011 in collaboration with Hitumi Nanayakkara and Bassam Jalgha spells out “Ejet Ejet”, which translates to “It Came, It Came” in Arabic. This sentence refers to the shortage of electricity in Lebanon. People are often asking if the electricity “came”. What is even cooler about this installation is that it dims as you get closer to it, and eventually turns off. I find it admirable that Ayah Bdeir managed to capture such an important concept of the Lebanese society in such a simple installation. Less is more I guess.

Littledrill for J.Crew

Image courtesy of Littledrill

I discovered Shelby Edwards, aka Little Drill on Instagram. She doesn’t have a massive online presence so I can’t tell you much more about her. She photographs objects in bright color schemes and experiments with their aesthetics to reinterpret them. You can check out her website here┬ábut I suggest you follow her on Instagram over here.