Bolshoi Academy x Erickson Beamon x Milk Studio

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Image from Tumblr

This picture was taken during the 2011 New York Fashion week; during which ballerinas from the Bolshoi Academy showcased jewelry by Erickson Beamon at Milk Studio.  When I first stumbled upon it, I thought it was a nice editorial shot and got excited about it but then I looked it up and found out it was actually a picture from an event (which is why there are no photo credits). So basically an event happened at Milk Studio where those ballerinas were having a life installation wearing pieces from Erickson Beamon’s collection.

It’s very posh but also kind of cool; and I like this photo in particular because of the aesthetics and because it’s a photograph reflection on two other arts, dance and fashion. Another cool thing about it is that it’s a very contemporary approach both in the presentation and in the nature of the arts. It’s not your classic painting/drawing/sculpture but it has a sense of timeless beauty while belonging exactly to the present (well 2011 at least).

Camera Selfies

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Image courtesy of Seen by

Camera Selfies is a series by J.F. Novotny, a German photographer who experiments with the concept of the selfie and applies it to vintage cameras. He places the camera in front of a wallpaper (which is sometimes too elaborate for my taste in some of the photos) contemporary to the camera. His aim is to capture the personality of each camera in a false self portrait. The viewer sees the artwork from the perspective of the mirror.

I find the idea more interesting than the artworks themselves but still worth publishing. I particularly like the Polaroid selfies since you can see a triple reflection of the subject; as the camera itself, the developed photo, and the reflection in the lens.

You can check out the rest of the series or even buy them here.

Silence/Shapes

All images courtesy of Filippo Minelli

Today I’m posting some contemporary art. This series by Filippo Minelli is a work on shaping silence and bringing attention to a happening in a certain set. The artist creates his photographs by setting up smoke bombs in selected locations. The essence of it is to capture the moment in a photograph; not to create a performance or installation.

The use of colored smoke bombs for silence is well thought through as they are usually associated with protests, crowds, and loud noises. This is entirely reinterpreted here and we see them put out of context, which is what art does I guess. There’s a lot more of conceptual thought behind the project, and you can read about that and see more pictures here but I like the fact that they have a high aesthetic value (in my opinion at least) in addition to a solid concept. I think that a lot of contemporary art is so conceptual and abstract (in the semantic not the artistic sense) that it eats up on the looks of it.

So if you’re a fan of Minelli make sure to check out his website here. He has other works about silence, and a favorite of mine is the Geometry of Silence installations which I might post about as well.

Untitled Series by AmourAmelia

All images courtesy of AmourAmelia

This set was created in November 2014 by a young photographer who goes by the name of AmourAmelia.I particularly like the fact that these photos are portraits and landscapes at the same time. It gives them quite a strong identity. Otherwise, I think she has really good editing skills and is worth checking out (click here for her website).

Littledrill for J.Crew

Image courtesy of Littledrill

I discovered Shelby Edwards, aka Little Drill on Instagram. She doesn’t have a massive online presence so I can’t tell you much more about her. She photographs objects in bright color schemes and experiments with their aesthetics to reinterpret them. You can check out her website here but I suggest you follow her on Instagram over here.

Papare Series

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All images courtesy of Gonzalo Fuenmayor

All images courtesy of Gonzalo Fuenmayor

This photo set by Gonzalo Fuenmayor was realized in 2014. Chandeliers were hung to banana plantations, lit, and photographed at night. The concept behind these piece of art follows from earlier works by the artist, examining ideas of identities and colonial history. Here, these ideas are taken even further as Fuenmayor combines the banana plantations, which are associated to a violent history; and the chandeliers as a symbol of luxury and opulence to study how decoration can mask ugly circumstances.

Again, these photographs are a social and historical study of colonial Latin America. They are based on the idea of contrast and harmony, and how opposing concepts can interact and complete each other. You can look at the rest of the set over here or see Fuenmayor’s exhibition at the MFA.

Balloon Zoo

All images courtesy of Sara Deremer

This is a photo manipulation project by American digital artists Sarah Deremer. She merged balloon animals with realistic textures, which gave this really cool result. Check out the rest of the project and more of her art on her website right here.

No No Ikebana

Image courtesy of the Guggenheim Museum

This series of 3 chromogenic prints by Sharon Lockhart, 2003, show Ikebana arranged by Haruko Takeichi. Ikebana is the Japanese art of aesthetically arranging florals. Takeichi is part of a rural community that creates Ikebana with vegetables and crops as a response to the elitist aspect of the art. These photographs were taken over the course of a month as Lockhart is interested in showing the effects of time on the composition. At the Guggenheim, they are displayed side by side in three separate frames; which I think serves this purpose better than stacking them on top of each other. Stay tuned for a review of the Guggenheim and head over to Sharon Lockhart’s website if you’d like to check out more of her art.

Duane Michals Seasons Sequence|Perceptions of Nature Exhibition

All pictures courtesy of The New York Review of Books

These four chromogenic prints are respectively entitled The Wintergarden’s White (2006), In Spring All Seems Green (2007), Summer is a Carnival of Cotton Candy Pink (2007), and Autumn is the Pot of Gold at the End of August’s Rainbow (2007). I came across them at a retrospective of the American photographer called “Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals” at the Peabody Essex Museum (review coming soon) which ended on June 21. They were displayed in this order, winter to autumn, except horizontally. These photographs actually belong to the Carnegie Museum of Art although they are not currently on show.

These are not Duane Michals’s most famous works, but they are part of his most recent. He is mainly renowned for his sequences of black and white photographs, which constituted the bulk of the exhibition. I was attracted to them because they were in colors and were landscapes rather than portraits, but also because they had this peculiar fan shape that made them stand out from the rest of the exhibition. They all represent Michals’s garden in all four seasons from the same angle which is simple and straightforward.

I figured this set would be appropriate to introduce my new exhibition, Perceptions of Nature. This exhibition will explore the relationships between artists and their environment, how they interpret it, how they use it, and how it affects them. In the meantime, the Metal Colors exhibitions will still be running because the advantage of this being a blog is that I don’t have space limitations and therefore I can still post artwork relevant to all exhibitions.

Reflections

All photos courtesy of Sebastian Magnani

This photo set is a current project by Swiss photographer Sebastian Magnani. The pictures were shot in various locations and explore the effects rendered by a spherical mirror lain on the ground. I find the relationship between the ground and the sky, as reflected in the mirror, to be super intriguing. It’s not often that we get to look at the floor and at the sky at the same time and it’s interesting to see how they may or may not be related. The mirror is the connecting point between them here and sometimes, what’s reflected in it can explain what we see on the ground. In other cases though, it’s like they’re two different worlds. What I also like about these pictures is that the floor serves as a sort of frame for what’s reflected in the mirror and I think it’s a fitting one because it’s what naturally falls under this reflection.

Ok enough deep talking, you can check out the rest of the pictures here.